NSA und PRISM

Giacomo_S

Ehrenmitglied
Mitglied seit
13. August 2003
Beiträge
2.801
Ehrlich gesagt verstehe ich die ganze Aufregung nicht.
Die Leute geben im Internet doch sowieso alles freiwillig preis.
 

Simple Man

Forenlegende
Mitglied seit
4. November 2004
Beiträge
8.450
Giacomo_S schrieb:
Die Leute geben im Internet doch sowieso alles freiwillig preis.
Tja, ich nicht. Trotzdem werde ich potenziell abgehört. Finde ich scheiße. Und ich erlaube mir, das auch zukünftig scheiße zu finden. Und damit bin ich offenbar nicht allein:
PewResearchCenter: "Anonymity, Privacy, and Security Online"
86% of adult internet users have taken steps from time to time to avoid surveillance by other people or organizations when they were using the internet. Despite their precautions, 21% of online adults have had an email or social media account hijacked and 11% have had vital information like Social Security numbers, bank account data, or credit cards stolen—and growing numbers worry about the amount of personal information about them that is available online.
 

Simple Man

Forenlegende
Mitglied seit
4. November 2004
Beiträge
8.450
G

Guest

Guest
Sehr interessanter Bericht vom HR

Ausgespäht von der amerikanischen Botschaft! Ausgespäht von der britischen Botschaft! Haben die “alliierten” Geheimdienste unsere Hauptstadt Berlin erneut in Sektoren aufgeteilt? Haben sie überhaupt je damit aufgehört? Obwohl wir doch seit mehr als 20 Jahren souverän und damit längst volljährig sind. Jetzt sollten wir uns wohl souverän dagegen wehren. Oder souverän darüber hinwegsehen. Oder souverän Gleiches mit Gleichem vergelten. Aber vielleicht müssen wir einfach nur erkennen, dass in Zeiten der Globalisierung Souveränität keinen Platz mehr hat.

http://mp3.podcast.hr-online.de/mp3/podcast/derTag/derTag_20131120.mp3
 

hives

Ehrenmitglied
Mitglied seit
20. März 2003
Beiträge
3.649
The hundreds of chilling mass surveillance programmes revealed by Edward Snowden in 2013 were – we assumed – the result of a failure of the democratic process. Snowden’s bravery finally gave Parliament and the public the opportunity to scrutinise this industrial-scale spying and bring the state back into check.

But, in an environment of devastatingly poor political opposition, the Government has actually extended state spying powers beyond those exposed by Snowden – setting a “world-leading” precedent. [...]

In fact, as the Bill finally passed on Wednesday evening, I was training a group of British and American journalists in how to protect themselves from state surveillance – not just from Russia or Syria, but from their own countries.

When Edward Snowden courageously blew the whistle on mass surveillance he warned that, armed with such tools, a new leader might “say that ‘because of the crisis, because of the dangers we face in the world, some new and unpredicted threat, we need more authority, we need more power.’ And there will be nothing the people can do at that point to oppose it”.
The Snooper's Charter passed into law this week – say goodbye to your privacy. The fact that you’re on this website is – potentially – state knowledge. Service providers must now store details of everything you do online for 12 months – and make it accessible to dozens of public authorities
 
Ähnliche Beiträge




Oben